14 Quick Tips For Safe Forklift Use

The skills needed to operate a lift truck must be developed through training and experience, both the truck and jobs to be done change from one work area to another.

This review will quickly describe use of the basic operating controls. When you get into new jobs or unfamiliar areas, ask your supervisor for help. Continue reading

Top 10 Tuesday: Week of April 5th

Forklift and material handling information is constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, G+, Facebook and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers.

Each week we sift through dozens and dozens of posts in order to refine what we share each day to just the top 10 posts that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness or the value of the information in the post. Continue reading

5 Tips For Novice Forklift Operators

toyota forklift moving into trailerThis week we’re fortunate to have a guest post from Tom Reddon. More about Tom can be found at the end of this post.

To the amateur or a beginner, operating a forklift can seem like a daunting task. However, following a few simple steps and procedures can make any forklift operation seamless. While a forklift is a heavy machine that must be handled with care, it can also provide exceptional results in the workplace. Forklifts can help any worker avoid the grueling errand of heavy lifting and streamline any loading or unloading process, which in turn results in enhanced worker productivity and improved functionality overall. Here are some tips for the first-time forklift operator or for any seasoned veteran: Continue reading

Top 10 Tuesday: Week of March 29th

top ten postsForklift and material handling information is constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, G+, Facebook and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers.

Each week we sift through dozens and dozens of posts in order to refine what we share each day to just the top 10 posts that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness or the value of the information in the post. Continue reading

3 Forklift Safety Areas: Parking, Lifting, Traveling

toyota forklift in useForklift operators need to remember specific rules for safety while they are working. Some may be more important in your workplace and you may know of some others that are only necessary where you work. In either case, supervisors need to know all the rules to help forklift operators stay safe.

Remember, while your operator’s manual is a great source of forklift information, it is not a training manual for new operators. Lift trucks are so much different than cars that even experienced automobile drivers need formal training, and OSHA requires it! Continue reading

Top 10 Tuesday: Week of March 22nd

top ten tuesdayForklift and material handling information is constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, G+, Facebook and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers.

Each week we sift through dozens and dozens of posts in order to refine what we share each day to just the top 10 posts that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness or the value of the information in the post. Continue reading

8 Simple Forklift Rules for Your Safety

cover forklift operators manualForklift operators need to remember specific rules for safety while they are working. Some may be more important in your workplace and you may know of some others that are only necessary where you work. In either case, supervisors need to know all the rules to help forklift operators stay safe.

Remember, while your operator’s manual is a great source of forklift information, it is not a training manual for new operators. Lift trucks are so much different than cars that even experienced automobile drivers need formal training, and OSHA requires it!

Many of these rules are in the OSHA, ANSI, National Safety Council, and other publications are in your operator’s manual. However, not all the information you need will in your manual, so please study them when setting your work rules.

Use the operator section of your operator’s manual as a starter to develop workplace rules that keep your plant safe. Call meetings with your people to explain your rules — post them where they can be read and enforce them.

8 Forklift Rules for Safety

  1. Daily Check: OSHA requires daily or each shift checks of major equipment, perform them!
  2. Don’t operate faulty equipment. Report problems and tag machine so others will not use it.
  3. Capacity: Capacity is based on load and length of load. Either condition in excess can cause loads to fall or tip a truck over.
  4. Maintenance: Operators are to perform only authorized simple maintenance such as charging the battery or checking fluid levels. Authorized, specially trained mechanics are needed to repair trucks. Park a truck that needs to be repaired. Don’t risk injury by trying to fix it.
  5. Truck Application: Know the ways your truck can operate safely. Don’t try to operate on rough ground.
  6. Ramps/Inclines: Travel loaded with load uphill at all times. Never turn or park on an incline.
  7. Stay Protected: Don’t travel with legs, arms or head outside the overhead guard. Watch for long objects that could come into the compartment as you travel. Never put hands or feet through the mast.
  8. Rules of the road: Unless directed otherwise by your employer, signs, etc., keep right; no passing at intersections or other dangerous places. Use horn only when necessary for signaling. Give pedestrians right-of-way.

We would enjoy hearing from you on your ideas for safety. Post your ideas or comments below, let’s start a dialog.

For more information, insights or conversations regarding your forklift or material handling needs. You can visit our online contact form, call me at 763-315-9288 or email kthill@toyotaequipment.com. We would welcome the opportunity to cover your material handling questions or concerns. Toyota Lift of Minnesota works very hard to be your partner, and material handling consultant. You can also use our contact form below!

Questions, Needs or A Concern? Contact Me Direct .

Top 10 Tuesday: Week of March 15th

Forklift and material handling information is constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, G+, Facebook and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers.

Each week we sift through dozens and dozens of posts in order to refine what we share each day to just the top 10 posts that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness or the value of the information in the post. Continue reading

Top 10 Tuesday: Week of March 8th

Forklift and material handling information is constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, G+, Facebook and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers.

Each week we sift through dozens and dozens of posts in order to refine what we share each day to just the top 10 posts that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness or the value of the information in the post. Continue reading

Forklift Hazards, Drivers and Pedestrians

forklifts in warehouseIn the workplace, lifting and transporting heavy objects are made easier with powered industrial trucks or forklifts. However, many hazards can be identified with its use. Last year, for OSHA’s most frequently cited violations, it listed power industrial trucks at fifth place. There are approximately 100 employees killed and 95,000 who suffer from injuries every year due to forklift operations in all industries. Continue reading

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...