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Forklift Accidents: Unexpected Result of Forklift Horseplay

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Forklifts account for only 1% of all warehouse or factory accidents. But forklift accidents tend to be more serious than others, accounting for 10% of all physical injuries in those workplaces.

Forklift safety is an ongoing learning experience. Proper training in accordance with OSHA requirements should be the first priority for all forklift operators. It is imperative that anyone who operates a forklift complies with OSHA’s training requirements. OSHA requirements have been in effect since 1999. Since they began mandating the training, forklift accidents have decreased even though the number of forklifts in use has risen steadily. An organization can be fined as much as $100,000 if proper training is not conducted for forklift operators.

Nearly 100 workers are killed each year in forklift related accidents. 24% of these accidents are the result of rollovers. Other accidents include works being struck by the forklift load, by the forklift itself, or workers falling off the forklift. The need to give safety your utmost attention as a business operator is made clear when assessing the statistics associated with forklift accidents. For example:

  • 34,000 serious injuries occur each year
  • Over 100,000 total accidents (serious and non-serious) happen each year
  • 42% of forklift fatalities are from the operator being crushed when the forklift tips over
  • 25% are crushed between the forklift and a surface (wall, load, etc.)
  • 8% of workers are crushed by material falling from the forklift
  • 4% of workers fall from a platform

Keeping these serious and troubling statistics in mind, implementing best practices in your facility in regard to safety is highly important.

Forklift Safety Best Practices

  1. Forklift Training

    OSHA recommends that a forklift driver be over the age of 18.
  2. Create a detailed training program for new employees and repeat the training for existing employees on a regular basis. This training should include:
    • Formal Instruction
    • Practical education
    • Evaluations / tests
  3. Know capacity ratings for the forklift being driven. Forklifts have specific ratings showing how much weight it can handle. Be sure that the weight limitations are posted clearly on the forklift and instruct operators to adhere to those limitations.
  4. Forklifts are equipped with back-up buzzers and warning signals because often it can be hard to see around loads. Train employees to listen for the audible warning signals.
  5. Keep your distance if you are not operating the forklift. Instruct employees to keep a good distance away from the immediate area where forklifts are being used.
  6. Slow Down if you are a forklift operator. Some forklifts come with options to limit their speed. This is a good idea to add to your forklift order. Instruct operators of the maximum speed at which they may operate and enforce those regulations.
  7. Surfaces should be clear, free from debris and safe for operators.
  8. Have regular forklift inspections on each forklift.

Improper forklift operation results in accidents, damage to products and facilities, and is the result of law suits for companies each year. By following OSHA regulations and adopting strict training rules and regulations at your organization, you can prevent these accidents.

While following these procedures can result in an improved safety setting, below are some specific situations where safety questions and concerns continually arise.

Facilities Considerations for Potential Forklift Safety Improvement

Forklift and pedestrian safetyBeyond following these rules for safety success, giving special attention to your facilities can help to improve safety in your operations. There are some general pieces of advice that can be followed, but remember, the unique needs and designs of your operation will ALWAYS dictate what safe practice looks like. Be sure to thoroughly analyze the safety of your site before making any major changes.

  • Keep pedestrians and forklifts separated when possible.Use different aisles for pedestrian passageways and material flow.
  • Use guards and barriers. Physical barriers assure that pedestrians and material handling equipment do not come into contact with each other.
  • Avoid tall, narrow aisles when possible. Height can mean more efficient storage. But make sure that your forklifts and operators are capable of working in them.
  • Do not obstruct intersection and doors.
  • Eliminate unnecessary noise pollution. When operators and pedestrians can’t hear each other, they are more likely to be involved in an accident.
  • Eliminate Poor Lighting. Operators and pedestrians need to see each other clearly whenever possible.
  • Avoid installing high-grade ramps or change in floor surfaces. Each can provide hazards for forklifts while in operation.

Understanding Forklift Capacities to Ensure Forklift Safety

So, you’ve purchased a 6,000 lb. forklift. That means you can lift 6,000 lbs. at all times, no matter what, right? Wrong.

The capacity rating of a forklift is the maximum weight at which it is able to safely maneuver at a specific load center. If the forks are not at that exact load center, if the mast type has been changed, or if attachments have been added, the forklift is not capable of maneuvering that load safely.

To avoid making the colossal mistake of exceeding your forklift’s maximum capacity, remember the following:

  1. Purchase a higher capacity forklift than you think you will need to prevent exceeding the limit.
  2. Always use a scale to measure loads so you’re sure you haven’t exceeded the capacity limit.
  3. Operators should be trained to know the difference between the forklift model number and the capacity rating on the data plate.
  4. Be sure the data plate is always in place and readable.
  5. Talk to a forklift specialist to be sure you’re using the right forklift for your application.

Though forklift accidents are becoming less frequent every year, one main cause of forklift accidents is an operator trying to maneuver loads that exceed the forklift’s capacity rating. Talk to your local Toyota Forklift Dealer to learn more about forklift capacity ratings and which forklift would be best for you and your business.

Forklift Safety: Avoiding Forklift Accidents in No Laughing Matter

Forklift safety is no laughing matter. Toyota makes it a priority to ensure that safety is at the forefront of all of our manufacturing processes and training efforts. But while safety comes standard at Toyota, it’s the responsibility of operators and their managers to be sure that Toyota forklifts are being used appropriately. When risks are taken in the name of having fun or joking around, accidents are bound to happen. Operators should monitor their personal behavior. But a good working environment means that operators are also looking out for each other as well. That means reporting inappropriate behavior when they see it. Here are a few clear examples of inappropriate forklift use for which operators and managers should be on the lookout:

  • Racing
  • Sitting on the counter-weight
  • Allowing passengers in either the operator cab or on the exterior of the lift
  • Lifting people with forks
  • Lifting unintended loads on the forks
  • Trying to distract an operator
  • Swerving in the vicinity of pedestrians
  • Adding people on the back of a lift to increase counter-weight
  • Turning off lights needed for operator visibility

At Toyota, we make industry-leading forklifts with a guarantee of quality, durability, value, and reliability. And our first priority is always your safety. If you or your associates need help recognizing appropriate and inappropriate forklift use, your local Toyota Forklift Dealer offers operator safety training.

We would enjoy hearing from you. Post your ideas or comments below, let’s start a dialog.

The original article was published by Toyota Material Handling. For more information, insights or conversations regarding your forklift or material handling needs. You can visit our online contact form, use our contact form seen to the right. We would welcome the opportunity to cover your material handling questions or concerns. Toyota Lift of Minnesota works very hard to be your partner and material handling, consultant.

By | May 27th, 2020|Categories: Forklift, forklift safety, Safety, Toyota|0 Comments

Top 10 Tuesday: Forklift, Logistics, Material Handling & Much More. The Most Popular Posts From the Week of May 17th

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top-10 post imageForklift and material handling information are constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook, and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers and that’s here in our top 10.

Every day we sift through dozens of posts and articles in order to refine what we share with others. Then each week just the top 10 posts [or so] that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness are posted by us in this weekly summary.

Did your article or your company’s post make the list? No? Send us a message with your blog or website address to make certain it’s in consideration.

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Top 10 Tuesday: Forklift, Logistics, Material Handling & Much More. The Most Popular Posts From the Week of May 10th

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forklift top ten photoForklift and material handling information are constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook, and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers and that’s here in our top 10.

Every day we sift through dozens of posts and articles in order to refine what we share with others. Then each week just the top 10 posts [or so] that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness are posted by us in this weekly summary.

Did your article or your company’s post make the list? No? Send us a message with your blog or website address to make certain it’s in consideration.

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Toyota Forklifts and Our Environment

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Toyota operates under a global earth charter that promotes environmental responsibility throughout the entire company. Toyota Material Handling (TMH) is responsible for manufacturing the majority of Toyota forklifts sold in North America. Making processes more green is a consideration in every process change or manufacturing improvement.

Here are five ways TMH makes its manufacturing processes environmentally-friendly:

  1. Toyota forklifts are manufactured at TMH, a zero-landfill facility.
  2. TMH requests suppliers use environmentally-friendly materials and processes in products supplied to Toyota.
  3. TMH requires its top 65 suppliers – who account for more than 85% of the materials purchased locally – to be ISO 14001 certified or have an equivalent EMS (Environmental Management System).
  4. The water sent back to the water treatment facility in Columbus, Indiana, (home to TMH) is cleaner than required by government standards.
  5. TMH made improvements to its paint operations, which includes the conversion of 50% of the painting processes over to powder coat and the addition of paint robots in other areas to improve transfer efficiency of solvent based paints.

Environmentally-Friendly Manufacturing at Your Own Facility

Toyota is committed to continuously improving our own environmental stewardship, and we ask our partners to do the same. Instituting recycling programs, minimizing pollution, and promoting the advantages of electric-powered forklifts are just a few considerations that make a difference.

What Can You Do?

There are a number of ways you can help your facility become more environmentally friendly and help reduce your operating costs. Something as simple as changing your thermostat can make a big difference. Allowing the temperature range in your facility to be a little warmer in the summer months and cooler in the winter months can have a positive impact on the environment and reduce your company’s overall carbon footprint – and your energy bill!

After changing your thermostat, inspect your lighting system. Is it energy-efficient? Using LED lights can certainly help.

You can also increase your number of alternative fuel forklifts, whether electric, propane or Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). Propane, for example, is non-toxic and clean-burning, so it’s versatile enough for indoor or outdoor applications. It’s also safe, economical, and requires little maintenance. Also consider recycling used oil.

If you work with partners or vendors, inspire them to adopt green initiatives as well. And if you’re finding your parking lot is looking pretty full, encourage carpooling among employees and offer incentives for doing so.

Using the Toyota Production System to Achieve Environmentally-Friendly Manufacturing

Toyota established a policy to reduce CO2 emissions, use resources more efficiently, and reduce environmental risk factors. Throughout its wide range of activities, Toyota always considers the environment as part of its daily operations. The policy is to analyze effects at each stage of a products’ life: development, manufacturing, operation, and recycling.

Toyota Production System (TPS) philosophy also includes the 3Rs: Reduce. Reuse. Recycle.

With respect to manufacturing, the reduction of waste (muda) is one of the key principles and, therefore, benefits of TPS. Reduction of waste in processing, inventory, conveyance, overproduction, motion, waiting, and manufacturing defects delivers direct environmental benefits.

At a lower level, waste sorting has long been practiced at Toyota’s manufacturing plants and Toyota’s forklift plant in Columbus, Indiana, where the majority of Toyota forklifts are built, has achieved ISO 14001 certification.

Three Ways to Eliminate Waste in Environmentally-Friendly Manufacturing

Cutting back on waste is often a long-term goal with multiple short-term steps. Here are a few of the steps you can take to get started:

  • Minimize waste by recycling and looking at your process to reduce the amount of raw materials used.
  • For remaining waste, consider a waste-to-energy facility. Is there a way to reuse the waste that was created?
  • Consider implementing a recycling program at your facility. Set goals for reduction in waste that goes to landfills.

We would enjoy hearing from you. Post your ideas or comments below, let’s start a dialog.

The original article was published by Toyota Material Handling U.S.A. For more information, insights or conversations regarding your forklift or material handling needs. You can visit our online contact form, use our contact form seen to the right.

We would welcome the opportunity to cover your material handling questions or concerns. Toyota Lift of Minnesota works very hard to be your partner and material handling, consultant.

By | May 13th, 2020|Categories: Forklift, Toyota|0 Comments

Top 10 Tuesday: Forklift, Logistics, Material Handling & Much More. The Most Popular Posts From the Week of May 3rd

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tuesday top ten imageForklift and material handling information are constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook, and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers and that’s here in our top 10.

Every day we sift through dozens of posts and articles in order to refine what we share with others. Then each week just the top 10 posts [or so] that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness are posted by us in this weekly summary.

Did your article or your company’s post make the list? No? Send us a message with your blog or website address to make certain it’s in consideration.

Continue reading

Toyota Forklift’s ASEC Certification Program Customer Pledge

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toyota asec parts service collageThe ASEC certification program is a process to help dealers focus on improved safety, productivity and customer satisfaction. The ASEC certification is a process to help dealers focus on improved safety, productivity and customer satisfaction. Alright, that sounds good but what does it bring to you the customer?

When even one piece of equipment is down, it can slow your entire operation. You need to be back up and running as quickly as possible, ensuring you meet all of your deadlines. That’s why efficient and effective aftermarket services from your dealer is essential to your success.

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By | May 6th, 2020|Categories: Business Insight, Efficiency, Forklift, Toyota|0 Comments

Top 10 Tuesday: Forklift, Logistics, Material Handling & Much More. The Most Popular Posts From the Week of April 26th

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top ten 3Forklift and material handling information are constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook, and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers and that’s here in our top 10.

Every day we sift through dozens of posts and articles in order to refine what we share with others. Then each week just the top 10 posts [or so] that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness are posted by us in this weekly summary.

Notable contributors this week include Linda ADAO @Linda_ADAO, HR Bartender @hrbartender, Land Line Magazine @Land_Line_Mag, Construction Dive @constructdive MHI @poweredbymhi, among others.

Did your article or your company’s post make the list? No? Send us a message with your blog or website address to make certain it’s in consideration.

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Top 10 Tuesday: Forklift, Logistics, Material Handling & Much More. The Most Popular Posts From the Week of April 19th

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top ten forkliftForklift and material handling information are constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook, and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers and that’s here in our top 10.

Every day we sift through dozens of posts and articles in order to refine what we share with others. Then each week just the top 10 posts [or so] that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness are posted by us in this weekly summary.

Notable contributors this week include DC Veloicty @DCVelocity Forklift Action @forkliftaction, Warehouse News @Warehouse_News, Kalmar Global @Kalmarglobal, Unicarriers @UniCarriersEU and Land Line Magazine @Land_Line_Mag among others.

Did your article or your company’s post make the list? No? Send us a message with your blog or website address to make certain it’s in consideration.

Continue reading

Top 10 Tuesday: Forklift, Logistics, Material Handling & Much More. The Most Popular Posts From the Week of April 12th

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top 10 forklift galForklift and material handling information are constantly shared or posted through dozens of sources. Websites, blogs, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook, and more share company and industry news, product insights as well as operational and safety information. Much of what is posted is promotional in nature but a fair percentage is informational and of possible interest to a wide range of readers and that’s here in our top 10.

Every day we sift through dozens of posts and articles in order to refine what we share with others. Then each week just the top 10 posts [or so] that we feel are the most relevant based on newsworthiness are posted by us in this weekly summary.

Notable contributors this week include Land Line Magazine @Land_Line_Mag, The Lima News @limanews, Cat Lift Trucks EAME @CatliftruckEAME, UniCarriers Europe @UniCarriersEU among others.

Did your article or your company’s post make the list? No? Send us a message with your blog or website address to make certain it’s in consideration.

Continue reading

The 5 Best Things About Planned Forklift Maintenance

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forklift planned maintenanceWhen you purchase your forklift, you’ll also have the option to purchase a planned forklift maintenance plan. Though every dealer offers different plans, the standards are Planned Maintenance (PM) and Full Maintenance (FM).

When you purchase a planned maintenance plan, you’ll pay a monthly fee to have your forklift serviced at every planned maintenance interval. Replacement parts and additional fixes are not included. However, the full maintenance plan will cover any maintenance need, barring specific exclusions, at a flat monthly rate.

But, why should you purchase a maintenance plan upfront, when you can pay as you go?

Purchasing a maintenance plan is a great way to save yourself money down the road. The first cost reduction you’ll see with a maintenance plan will be in downtime. Downtime is the single most expensive cost associated with a forklift. Maintenance plans facilitate early catches and easier access to technicians, increasing your uptime. Second, a maintenance plan will ensure your forklift is getting the care it needs, making the lifespan better and longer. Third, you’ll have the option to pay by the month, regardless of the maintenance plan you choose, making your maintenance easier to budget for. There are other available benefits of planned maintenance that will become clear as you engage your provider over the lifetime of your contract.

When it comes to maintenance, which is imperative to the longevity of your forklift, a maintenance plan is the way to go. When considering what to expect from a planned maintenance agreement (and how to make sure you’re with a provider who can follow through on their promises), Toyota’s helpful guide below can help you ensure success.

Forklift Maintenance: What to Expect During my Planned Maintenance Technician Visit

When your forklifts are placed in a planned maintenance rotation, you’ll have a technician on site inspecting your forklifts to be sure they are in top working condition. That means a Toyota Certified Technician is regularly on site to answer any specific questions you might have about the functionality of your fleet while they work to ensure your forklifts are in top working condition.

When a service tech is on site, they will be inspecting several parts of your forklift for optimal working condition. This will include:

  1. Mast, lift chains, forks, hydraulics
  2. Running and braking system
  3. Control system
  4. IC engine or electric motor
  5. Vehicle body and safety components

If your technician is thorough, you should be able to visibly see them inspect these specific areas. To ensure top quality inspection is occurring, it might be useful to request a PM inspection form before your begin the engagement with your service provider. Then, when a technician in on site, you can request that you see the completed form. This will help to make sure you’re getting exactly what you paid for. All Toyota Dealers have these forms available.

What Is the Long-Term Value of Planned Forklift Maintenance?

infographic headerOne of the most important long-term values of planned maintenance is that it will save you money. Avoiding repair costs and downtime because maintenance issues are caught early before they become problems is one main contributing factor. But there are others, as we illustrate here:

More important than these cost savings can be the long-term benefit of planned forklift maintenance on the safety and security of operators. Worn out components can lead to accidents, but a technician might be able to replace these components during planned maintenance before they become too worn to function.

Increased efficiency is also a benefit, both because your forklifts will see increased uptime because of frequent maintenance and because you can plan for downtime during regularly scheduled inspection.

Planned forklift maintenance can also have additional, unanticipated benefits. For example, interruption to your daily schedule caused by a forklift breaking down might be avoided with planned maintenance. Instead of your having to take the time to call around attempting to locate a service tech to get the forklift back up and running, a Toyota Certified Technician will be on site regularly to help prevent such problems from occurring. You also won’t have to wait for an available technician to maintenance your forklift.

How Do I Know I’ve Chosen the Right Partner for Planned Forklift Maintenance?

Planned maintenance sounds great in theory, right? But it’s only great in practice if you have a dedicated partner who is willing to go the extra mile for your business. As you would when you purchase material handling equipment, perform thorough research to make sure you’re getting the right partner. Ask your potential partner for referrals for other businesses they’ve currently worked with. Take the time to interview your potential partner and get to know some of their technicians. After the engagement has begun, ask to see PM completion rates on your fleet to make sure they are holding up their end of your agreement.

As part of the Toyota 360 Support promise, Toyota is dedicated to being the industry leader in customer support and aftermarket services. Our dealers are happy to provide any of the information you request and can come on site for discussions leading up to a planned maintenance agreement.

We would enjoy hearing from you. Post your ideas or comments below, let’s start a dialog. The original article was published by Toyota Material Handling U.S.A. For more information, insights or conversations regarding your forklift or material handling needs. You can visit our online contact form, use our contact form seen to the right. We would welcome the opportunity to cover your material handling questions or concerns. Toyota Lift of Minnesota works very hard to be your partner and material handling, consultant.

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By | April 15th, 2020|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments