>forklift safety

Military Matters: Helping Veterans Get off on the Right Foot in Civilian Life Through Forklift Certification

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forklift training free for vetsOur veterans have given a lot of themselves to all of us, Toyota Lift of Minnesota through forklift certification and training is working to give Minnesota veterans a leg up in their civilian life. Did you know that operators of powered industrial trucks must be fully trained and employer certified as required by OSHA federal regulation? As part of the regulation, truck operators are required to complete
formal classroom training, practical hands-on training, and evaluation. We knew we could help with that.

In March of 2011, through the generosity of Toyota Industrial Equipment, who is celebrating more than 50 years in business in North America. TMHU is the supplier of Toyota lift trucks, the number one selling brand since 2002. In addition to the full line of high-quality lift trucks, the company’s extended industrial equipment solutions include Automatic Guided Vehicles and tow tractors. Toyota Lift of Minnesota began testing and certifying veterans in forklift operation. We have since certified several hundred veterans. Our training agenda includes:

  • Introduction To Safe Lift Truck Operation
    (includes the review of Operator, and Pedestrian videos.)
  • Familiarization With The Lift Truck –
    (cost, weight/mass, instruments, and controls)
  • Operator Maintenance Responsibilities (inspections, equipment checks)
  • Starting And Driving Practice
    (practical application of skills in your environment)
  • Material Handling Practice
    (using loads your drivers are familiar with)
  • Review And Test
    (repeat showing of the videos, give furnished quiz orally and written)

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Forklift Operators: Defenders of Pedestrian Safety in the Workplace

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pedestrians forklift blurred warehouse rackingForklift operators have two critical jobs to account for in addition to their daily tasks: keeping themselves safe and ensuring pedestrian safety in their work environments. However, pedestrian safety might also be increased if non-operators take simple precautions when walking in areas of forklift use. Ultimately, it’s about developing a culture of communication and awareness that keeps everyone safer in any environment. Here are some ideas that you can explore to potentially make your work space safer. Continue reading

Forklift Lights: Are You as Confused by the Choices Available as We Are?

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Extreme care protecting our extremities is key. Read what Toyota tells us about them helping us keep arms, legs, toes, and fingers safe.Forklift lights are essential and there are many different types of forklift safety lights depending on the types of use or operation you enter. Because of all of the combinations of lights that can end up on a forklift, it can get confusing to understand the function of each. Let’s explore if you need a forklift light, the meaning of what a forklift light communicates when lit, and how forklift lights can be part of a safe working environment.

The most common lights on a forklift are headlights and tail lights (or brake lights). When they are configured on a forklift, headlights are located on the front of the forklift and tail lights are located on the rear or back of the forklift. Three other common forklift lighting accessories useful in a wide variety of operations are strobe lights, blue pedestrian spotlights, and red side pedestrian lights. When they are included on a forklift, these lights are usually located on the back, front and side are intended to increase the safety in forklift operation.

Do you need any of these forklift lights? The short answer is: it depends. The optional lights you put on your forklifts will depend on your specific operation.

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By | December 5th, 2018|Categories: Forklift, forklift safety, Toyota|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Forklift Lights: You Must Choose but Choose Wisely

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forklift headlightsTraditional incandescent forklift lights can be a real pain if they give off a dim yellow untrue light, the bulbs need to be frequently replaced, and they are made of glass which can easily shatter. But of course, there are options available.

The material handling industry is composed of limitless application varieties. Sure, you have your general industries such as cold storage or lumber where common elements are shared from location to location, but even within these environments, you have differences that need to be accounted for. This includes different floor types, ambient temperatures, racking configurations, lighting conditions, and so much more. With all of these varying conditions, how can you find a forklift that will work for all of them? The answer is: you can’t.

This is why forklift options are so important and so prevalent in the material handling industry because it gives you an opportunity to customize your forklift to fit your specific needs. If you’re in a cold storage environment, you likely need additional safeguards to protect against moisture and low ambient temperatures while a forging application is more concerned with how high ambient temperatures could damage hydraulic hoses and other components.

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By | November 28th, 2018|Categories: Forklift, forklift safety, Parts, Toyota|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Alright, Just How Do You Operate a Sit-down Forklift?

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toyota forklift on rampSit-down forklift trucks are the most commonly used forklifts today. Most commonly they are ITA forklift classes one, four and five. Sit-down forklift manufacturers are now focusing on operator comfort and its impact on productivity. “A happy operator is a productive operator” is the new mindset of the leading manufacturers.

Most industries require material handling equipment to move products from A to B. Most often, this is done with a forklift. As with all material handling equipment, this brief guide is not a replacement for specialized training and certification in their safe operation. Here are some brief guidelines for how to drive a sit-down forklift. Continue reading

Forklift Truck Power, Fretting Over Internal Combustion

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Forklift co exhaustForklift trucks powered by internal combustion engines run on a variety of fuels, including gasoline, diesel fuel, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and compressed natural gas. Forklifts with internal combustion engines can be quickly refueled but require regular maintenance checks for leaks of fuel or oil and worn parts to keep systems working properly.

The use of LP, CNG, gasoline, and diesel forklifts can provide an increase in efficiency and higher ROI for many different types of operations. Whether moving material between manufacturing steps or increasing throughput in a warehouse, Toyota offers a wide variety of pneumatic tire and cushion tire gas-powered forklifts to fit your needs. Continue reading

By | October 24th, 2018|Categories: Forklift, forklift safety, Safety|Tags: , , |0 Comments

After Warehouse Spills, What Do You do Next?

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toyota walkie stacker pallet jack warehouseWarehouse spills should be anticipated and prevented whenever possible. But even the most careful warehouse manager or operator can have a spill happen on their watch. Specific advice about what to do in the middle of a spill will ultimately depend on what you spilled. But there are some general things to keep in mind after a spill has occurred that can help you clean up and prevent the next one. Continue reading

By | September 12th, 2018|Categories: Forklift, forklift safety, Safety, Warehouse|0 Comments

Forklift Inspection, Whys and Whens

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blurred toyota forklift technician with forkliftForklift Inspection Background: 29 CFR 1910.178(q)(7) requires that “Industrial trucks shall be examined before being placed in service and shall not be placed in service if the examination shows any condition adversely affecting the safety of the vehicle. Such examination shall be made at least daily. Where industrial trucks are used on a round-the-clock basis, they shall be examined after each shift. Defects, when found, shall be immediately reported and corrected.”

Forklift inspection is a task that helps to ensure material handling equipment is up to par with operation standards at all times. But how often should operators inspect their forklift? Here’s a handy guide on the frequency of forklift inspection: Continue reading

Carbon Monoxide: It’s No One’s Friend

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Forklift co exhaustCarbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, and toxic gas emitted by gas-powered devices including automobile and forklift internal combustion engines. Due to its colorless and odorless nature, CO is difficult to detect and can have negative effects in different concentrations. As CO is the main output of forklift engines powered by LPG, your operators’ exposure to the gas should be limited and monitored. Continue reading

Forklift Certification is Making the World a Better Place

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toyota forklift safety posterWebster’s dictionary defines the forklift in this sentence: “A self-propelled machine for hoisting and transporting heavy objects by means of steel fingers inserted under the load” Most of us know it as an indispensable piece of equipment that plays a large role in the supply chain the world over. While it may be indispensable, as a machine that operates in all conditions, and often near pedestrians its use doesn’t come without serious risk. Therefor forklift safety rules that are followed by well trained operators are critical in workplace safety.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published a final rule requiring training of powered industrial truck operators on December 1, 1998 (63 FR 66238, 29 CFR Parts 1910, 1915, 1917, 1918 and 1926. The final rule was adopted on November 17, 1998). The new requirements apply to the use of powered industrial trucks in general industry, construction, shipyards, marine terminals and longshoring operations. They do not apply to agricultural operations.

In general, the rule requires employers to develop an operator training program that incorporates the basic principles of safe truck operation for the type of trucks being used in the workplace and recognizes the hazards in the workplace. The amount of time devoted to training and the method of training is to be determined by the operator’s demonstrated ability to operate the truck safely. Each operator’s performance must be evaluated at least every three years and refresher training must be provided when needed.

We strongly suggest you to read the entire final rule here.

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